Foreign Adoptions

There are two types of foreign adoptions: one in which the adoption is NOT finalized abroad and one in which the adoption is finalized abroad. The requirements of both types are described below.

 

FOREIGN ADOPTION WHEN NOT ADOPTED ABROAD (G.S. 48-2-205)

When an adoption is not finalized in a foreign country and the child is being adopted in North Carolina, the following documents are needed:

Click Here for a Printable Checklist. Forms can be opened and printed by clicking on the form number.

___ Petition for Adoption of Minor Child (DSS-1800)

___ Original or copy certified by clerk* of consent from US agency or appropriate foreign agency, abandonment order or guardianship order with translation

___ Original or copy certified by clerk* of the foreign birth certificate with translation

___ Copy of the adoptive parents’ preplacement assessment valid when child placed and certified by the agency that prepared it

___ Order for Report on Proposed Adoption (DSS-1807)

___ Report on Proposed Adoption (DSS-1808)

___ Disclosure of Fees and Expenses Affidavit (DSS-5191)

___ Decree of Adoption (DSS-1814) (with new date of birth per G.S. 48-2-603(b)(3) if exact one unknown)

___ Report to Vital Records** (DSS-1815)

*NOTE: If a petitioner does not want to relinquish the original of the foreign document, the alternative is for the clerk to make a copy and certify that it is a copy of the original using a Foreign Readoption Affidavit. This affidavit can be accessed by the clerk on Juno.

**NOTE: If the adoptive parents must re-adopt the child to obtain US citizenship, they should ask for a copy of the Report to Vital Records (DSS-1815) to be released to them before the adoption is finalized. G.S. 48-9-102(b) allows the clerk to enter such an order while the adoption is pending. Once final, an adoption can only be opened by motion under G.S. 48-9-105 asking for the same document. This document is needed by Citizenship and Immigration to prove that the child who came into the US on an IR4 or IH4 visa is the same child who has been adopted under a different name.

 


 

FOREIGN ADOPTION WHEN ADOPTED ABROAD (G.S. 48-2-205)

When an adoption is finalized in a foreign country and the child is being readopted in North Carolina, the following documents are needed:

Click Here for a Printable Checklist. Forms can be opened and printed by clicking on the form number.

___ Petition for Adoption of Minor Child (DSS-1800)

___ Original or copy certified by clerk* of foreign adoption decree with translation

___ Original or copy certified by clerk* of the foreign birth certificate or    abandonment order with translation, as well as amended birth certificate, if available

___ Copy of the adoptive parents’ preplacement assessment valid when child placed and certified by the agency that prepared it

___ Order for Report on Proposed Adoption (DSS-1807)

___ Report on Proposed Adoption (DSS-1808)

___ Disclosure of Fees and Expenses Affidavit (DSS-5191)

___ Decree of Adoption (DSS-1814)(with new date of birth per 48-2-603(b)(3) if exact one unknown)

___Report to Vital Records** (DSS-1815)

*NOTE: If a petitioner does not want to relinquish the original of the foreign document, the alternative is for the clerk to make a copy and certify that it is a copy of the original using a Foreign Readoption Affidavit. This affidavit can be accessed by the clerk on Juno.

**NOTE: If the adoptive parents must re-adopt the child to obtain US citizenship, they should ask for a copy of the Report to Vital Records (DSS-1815) to be released to them before the adoption is finalized. G.S. 48-9-102(b) allows the clerk to enter such an order while the adoption is pending. Once final, an adoption can only be opened by motion under G.S. 48-9-105 asking for the same document. This document is needed by Citizenship and Immigration to prove that the child who came into the US on an IR4 or IH4 visa is the same child who has been adopted under a different name.

 

State Law prohibits the Clerk’s Office staff from; providing any legal advice, providing instructions for completing forms, referring an attorney, or recommending specific ways to pursue legal action.

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